Thursday, January 10, 2013

ICT in Education, Bloom’s revisited

If I said that Bloom’s Taxonomy has been revisited, you may think that this is another point of view of this famous taxonomy and not worth spending a minute on it.

But when the revision has been made by Andrew Churches, author of the nominated "Best Educational Wiki" 2012 Edublog Awards, things can be seen with other eyes.

Evaluating has moved down the hierarchy and Creating has replaced Synthesizing at the top level. Meanwhile, Knowledge has been replaced by Remembering at the bottom of the pyramid.

edorigami.wikispaces.com   Bloom's Digital Taxonomy


You can find this revision and many other interesting reflections and thoughts about Bloom’s Taxonomy in Educational Origami’s blog or wiki. Both sites are about 21st Century Teaching and Learning and the “integration of technology” into the classroom.


Of course there are so many different pages with tips, activities and resources in the net about integrating new technologies in the classroom, but Educational Origami goes one step beyond as this is a “tough cookie” and certainly a critical area: “ it is about shifting our educational paradigm”.

I like the way Andrew Churches (Edorigami’s author) explains the paradigm:

“The world is not as simple as saying teachers are digital immigrants and students digital natives. In fact, we know that exposure to technology changes the brains of those exposed to it. The longer and stronger the exposure and the more intense the emotions the use of the technology or its content evokes, the more profound the change. This technology is increasingly ubiquitous. We have to change how we teach, how we assess, what we teach, when we teach it, where we are teaching it, and with what”. 

It’s a tall order, but these are exciting times.

21st Century teachers 

This is a great video that encourages finding solutions to help our education progress forward. We have to admit technology is coming whether we want it to come or not. The longer we wait on accepting this, the further our children fall.



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